Data-Driven Architecture

Standard

What would happen if we approached architecture from a data-centric perspective? What if we started with what we know about how we live, about what matters to us, about what’s responsible to the planet—and designed, built and lived accordingly?

via Medium.

Lego House in Billund, Denmark

Standard

This week the first six oversize Lego bricks were laid for the foundation of the Lego House in Billund, Denmark, the Lego Group’s hometown. Designed by BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group, the architecture of the Lego House is based on—what else but?—the iconic shape of the Lego brick.

via Slate.

Where We Came From and Where We Went, State by State

Standard

The charts document domestic migration since the turn of the last century, based on census data. For every state, we’ve broken down the population in two ways. You can now see two views for each state: where people who live in a state were born, or where people who were born in a state have moved to. The ribbons are color-coded by region, and foreign-born residents are included at the bottom, in gray, to complete the picture for each state.

via NYTimes.com.

Americans Have Taken 23 Million Bike Share Rides and No One Has Died

Standard

With 36 cities across the country now hosting their own systems, bike share is almost becoming an American institution. According to a new report, it’s estimated that Americans have taken 23 million rides since 2007 (wow!), but here’s the most amazing part: Not a single death has been attributed to a bike share system in the U.S. At least not yet.

via Gizmodo.

Bus-Only Shoulders

Standard

Metro Transit wanted a way to get buses through traffic more cost effectively. At the same time, MnDOT was looking for ways to make better use of of existing lanes.

They experimented with bus-only shoulders along Highway 252 and liked the results: bus drivers could stay on schedule, commuters got to work or home faster and ridership increased. Even better, bus-only shoulders cost a fraction of added lanes.

MnDOT found that by allowing transit vehicles to use shoulders, they could move more people more quickly with minimal investment. Now, as roadways are built or reconstructed, shoulders are made to accommodate the extra weight and width of a bus.

via Metro Transit.