Explore the TWA Terminal

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TWA Terminal

Right now, a team of digital scanning whizzes is back in their Florida lab, making a digital 3D model of the TWA Flight Center. Last week, while the staff and their equipment were hard at work recording every curve, bend, window, and facade of Eero Saarinen’s 1962 terminal at John F. Kennedy International Airport, photographer Max Touhey was granted access. That much free time inside the historic, beloved landmark is hard to come by—especially with a camera in hand—given that it has been off limits to the public since 2001 and is set to undergo redevelopment into a boutique hotel.

[Source: Curbed NY]

The Software Behind Frank Gehry’s Geometrically Complex Architecture

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The first generation of architecture and engineering software was developed in the late 1970s. It allowed designers to draw via the computer instead of on paper. But the results were still just drawings.  In the 1990s, Frank Gehry pioneered a second generation of  “smart” digital design in architecture, by using software to optimize designs and translate them directly into a process of fabrication and construction.

Now known in the industry as parametric design and building information modeling, this approach has ushered in a new era of architecture, according to art historian Irene Nero: the era of “technological construction.” And Gehry Technologies drove this innovation, even though Gehry himself “speaks with a certain degree of pride in his inability to operate a computer,” as CTO Dennis Shelden observed in his MIT doctoral dissertation.

via Priceonomics.

The Best and Worst Places to Grow Up

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Location matters – enormously. If you’re poor and live in the Austin area, it’s better to be in Lee County than in Caldwell County or Travis County. Not only that, the younger you are when you move to Lee, the better you will do on average. Children who move at earlier ages are less likely to become single parents, more likely to go to college and more likely to earn more.

via NYTimes.com.

With Porches And Parks, A Texas Community Aims For Urban Utopia

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The traditional model of residential American development is to lay out a grid of streets and line them with two-story houses featuring giant closets and voluptuous two-car garages.

Mueller, in contrast, is intentionally dense development. Construction began in 2007, and today, walking along the sidewalks, you notice tiny yards and big, inviting front porches. The car is still king here, but many of them are hybrids and electrics, and they’re out of sight.

“At Mueller, every house has a garage, but they’re always in the back. The porch is in the front,” says Jim Adams, hired by the City of Austin as Mueller’s master planner.

via NPR.

It’s Foolish To Define Austin By Its City Limits

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Cities grow in two key ways, and when we talk about how “big” a “city” has become, or how fast it has grown, we often conflate two forms of expansion: spatial and demographic. On the one hand, the footprint of a city changes shape; year to year and decade to decade, growing municipalities annex more and more land. On the other hand, urban growth also involves a bigger and bigger batch of humanity living in and around that bulging municipality.

But the one hand does not always know what the other is doing, and when population growth outpaces geographic growth — like it has in Austin — things get messy.

via FiveThirtyEight.

The US border is 100 miles wide

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Why does this matter?

Searches within the 100-mile extended border zone, and outside of the immediate border-stop location, must meet three criteria: a person must have recently crossed a border; an agent should know that the object of a search hasn’t changed; and that “reasonable suspicion” of a criminal activity must exist, says the CRS.

Kottke.